DAVID KENNEDY CUTLER & RYAN WALLACEFLATBED BENDS
2. 27 – 3. 29, 2014 | Cooper Cole | Toronto

Cooper Cole is pleased to present Flatbed Bends, a 2-person exhibition pairing sculptures by David Kennedy Cutler with paintings by Ryan Wallace. These Brooklyn-based artists have been engaged in a dialog about their work for several years. Both are particularly concerned with the rapid and far-reaching effects of digital innovation and how their work might reflect their unique circumstance: old enough to have experienced a predominately analog world, yet young enough to have fully immersed in the digital.

The artists have selected an excerpt from a 1972 essay by Leo Steinberg (pictured above), which describes the development of the ‘flatbed picture plane’ as a transitional moment in art history, one that interpreted the changing nature of perception in the modern world. Steinberg suggested that the reorientation of vantage within mid 20th century art making “let the world in again.” 

Wallace and Kennedy Cutler work in distinct mediums (painting and sculpture, respectively) yet utilize borrowed strategies: collage, relief, readymades, print and photography.  Their abstract forms are shrouded under compressed layers, where a great deal of activity happens in shallow space. Seemingly bound together on the surface by rudimentary mends both artists’ works are composed from their immediate environment. Wallace employes residue of previous works and the materials that went in to their physical construction. Never gleaning from beyond studio – vinyl screens, run off from the printing press, ripped and removed canvas, paper, tapes, glass tinting film, are applied along with oil, enamel, cold wax, and pigments to his surfaces. Kennedy Cutler draws from digitally scanned compositions of his domestic and studio life. Vegetables, bread, packing materials, clothes, his apartment and studio floors, his, his wife’s and cats’ bodies are scanned and then digitally printed onto sheets of aluminum. Using his body and rudimentary hand tools, these panels are bent, twisted and torn. 

Despite recalling Steinberg’s conception of a flatbed plane, Wallace and Kennedy Cutler’s works do not “let the world in again” in the manner of Rauschenberg and his contemporaries.  They are narrowly introverted and hyper-compressed, reflective of how contemporary culture spends its time: neck down, navigating screens comprised of layers upon layers of windows, applications, pop-ups, tool bars, cursors and keyboards.  While the mediated surface of the paintings and sculptures suggests virtual insularity, the artists’ embrace of visceral contortions in their working methods reasserts the physical. The division between serves as a metaphor to the divided consciousness of the early 21st century.

DAVID KENNEDY CUTLER & RYAN WALLACE
FLATBED BENDS

2. 27 – 3. 29, 2014 | Cooper Cole | Toronto

Cooper Cole is pleased to present Flatbed Bends, a 2-person exhibition pairing sculptures by David Kennedy Cutler with paintings by Ryan Wallace. These Brooklyn-based artists have been engaged in a dialog about their work for several years. Both are particularly concerned with the rapid and far-reaching effects of digital innovation and how their work might reflect their unique circumstance: old enough to have experienced a predominately analog world, yet young enough to have fully immersed in the digital.

The artists have selected an excerpt from a 1972 essay by Leo Steinberg (pictured above), which describes the development of the ‘flatbed picture plane’ as a transitional moment in art history, one that interpreted the changing nature of perception in the modern world. Steinberg suggested that the reorientation of vantage within mid 20th century art making “let the world in again.”

Wallace and Kennedy Cutler work in distinct mediums (painting and sculpture, respectively) yet utilize borrowed strategies: collage, relief, readymades, print and photography. Their abstract forms are shrouded under compressed layers, where a great deal of activity happens in shallow space. Seemingly bound together on the surface by rudimentary mends both artists’ works are composed from their immediate environment. Wallace employes residue of previous works and the materials that went in to their physical construction. Never gleaning from beyond studio – vinyl screens, run off from the printing press, ripped and removed canvas, paper, tapes, glass tinting film, are applied along with oil, enamel, cold wax, and pigments to his surfaces. Kennedy Cutler draws from digitally scanned compositions of his domestic and studio life. Vegetables, bread, packing materials, clothes, his apartment and studio floors, his, his wife’s and cats’ bodies are scanned and then digitally printed onto sheets of aluminum. Using his body and rudimentary hand tools, these panels are bent, twisted and torn.

Despite recalling Steinberg’s conception of a flatbed plane, Wallace and Kennedy Cutler’s works do not “let the world in again” in the manner of Rauschenberg and his contemporaries. They are narrowly introverted and hyper-compressed, reflective of how contemporary culture spends its time: neck down, navigating screens comprised of layers upon layers of windows, applications, pop-ups, tool bars, cursors and keyboards. While the mediated surface of the paintings and sculptures suggests virtual insularity, the artists’ embrace of visceral contortions in their working methods reasserts the physical. The division between serves as a metaphor to the divided consciousness of the early 21st century.

Cooper Cole Gallery - Untitled Miami Beach 2013
Ryan Wallace | Georgia Dickie | Joseph Hart

Cooper Cole Gallery - Untitled Miami Beach 2013
Ryan Wallace | Georgia Dickie | Joseph Hart

Cooper Cole Gallery - Untitled Miami Beach 2013

Cooper Cole Gallery - Untitled Miami Beach 2013

REDACTOR
October 19 - November 16, 2013
Mark Moore Gallery
790 Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232

Tel 310 453 3031
info@markmooregallery.com

REDACTOR
October 19 - November 16, 2013
Mark Moore Gallery
790 Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232

Tel 310 453 3031
info@markmooregallery.com

DUST

RYAN WALLACE | TABLET
August 30 – October 9, 2013MARIANNE FRIIS GALLERY
Bredgade 22, 1260 Copenhagen, Denmark
Phone: +45 88 82 30 29 – Mobile: +45 22 18 86 73

RYAN WALLACE | TABLET
August 30 – October 9, 2013
MARIANNE FRIIS GALLERY
Bredgade 22, 1260 Copenhagen, Denmark
Phone: +45 88 82 30 29 – Mobile: +45 22 18 86 73

Interview with Steven Cox via Hunted Projects

Interview with Steven Cox via Hunted Projects

MATT MIGNANELLI & RYAN WALLACE
June 7 - July 16, 2013Bleecker Street Arts Club
305 Bleecker Street, New York, NY 

Opening reception June 6, 6- 9 pm

MATT MIGNANELLI & RYAN WALLACE
June 7 - July 16, 2013
Bleecker Street Arts Club
305 Bleecker Street, New York, NY

Opening reception June 6, 6- 9 pm

TERRAFORM

TERRAFORM

STATIC & SCRIM
January 31 – February 23, 2013Glen Baldridge, Colby Bird, Patrick Brennan, David Kennedy-Cutler,
Sam Moyer, Sara Greenberger Rafferty, Ryan WallaceCOOPER COLE GALLERY
1161 DUNDAS STREET WEST | TORONTO, ON M6J 1X3 CANADA
INFO@COOPERCOLEGALLERY.COM | +1 647 347 3316

STATIC & SCRIM
January 31 – February 23, 2013
Glen Baldridge, Colby Bird, Patrick Brennan, David Kennedy-Cutler,
Sam Moyer, Sara Greenberger Rafferty, Ryan Wallace

COOPER COLE GALLERY
1161 DUNDAS STREET WEST | TORONTO, ON M6J 1X3 CANADA
INFO@COOPERCOLEGALLERY.COM | +1 647 347 3316

GUERRERO GALLERY
December 15 - January 5Terry Powers, Alisha Kerlin, Ryan Wallace, Christopher Russell, Richard Colman, Hiro Kurata, Vitor Reyes

2700 19th Street
San Francisco, CA 94110
415.400.5168
guerrerogallery.com

GUERRERO GALLERY
December 15 - January 5
Terry Powers, Alisha Kerlin, Ryan Wallace, Christopher Russell, Richard Colman, Hiro Kurata, Vitor Reyes

2700 19th Street
San Francisco, CA 94110
415.400.5168
guerrerogallery.com

Benjamin Sutton at NADA HUDSON via ART INFO

RYAN WALLACE | CONSENSUS
NADA HUDSON | MORGAN LEHMAN GALLERY
July 28-29, 2012
Basilica Hudson 110 South Front Street, Hudson, NY

The New Art Dealers Alliance and Basilica Hudson are pleased to announce NADA Hudson, a large scale exhibition featuring 51 projects presented by NADA members and affiliates. NADA Hudson is not an art fair, but rather a site-specific project produced by the New Art Dealers Alliance, which will build upon the character of a historic venue in showcasing contemporary sculpture, installation and performance.Morgan Lehman Gallery will be exhibiting Ryan Wallace’s Consensus series. In his Consensus sculptures, Ryan Wallace explores the nature of perception. He combines his allure to contemporary science with his skepticism of representing the spiritual and mystical, suggesting the only constant among these disciplines to be the limit of human observation. The stones are arranged in formations inside vitrines behind varied tinted films. The automotive tints act as a filter, skewing the repeated objects visual reception. The rocks themselves suggest the possibility of infinite replication, with the exception of the tinted screen, which suggests the uniqueness and malleable nature of individual perception.These mineral formations in Wallace’s trompe l’oeil sculptures are “insignificant arrangements” but that the compositions force a viewer to consider a “potential higher meaning,” creating formal exercises that can’t escape their loaded nature. He cites Giuseppe Penone’s river stones, Stonehenge, and the caves of Lascaux and Cheveux among his influences, but claims the inspiration itself is analogous to the drive behind the scientist: the desire for discovery. Wallace’s usage of pedestrian media like auto tints and vitrines in the fine art context works to break down the barriers between high versus low, art object versus scientific display.

The Basilica Hudson, built in 1884 as a foundry and forge for the manufacture of steel railway wheels, is the last great 19th century building on the Hudson waterfront. NADA is grateful for the team at Basilica Hudson who offer a home for the artistic and cultural community at large. NADA Hudson will occupy nearly 8,000 square feet of indoor space, a theatre space and well over 10,000 square feet of outdoor space.

Hudson, New York is becoming a popular satellite city for cultural activity.  Hudson is home to many dealers specializing in antiques and decorative arts, while also attracting international artists like Marina Abromovic and Jason Middlebrook. Hudson is very accessible to visitors from New York City. Trains run frequently to Hudson about every hour leaving from Pennsylvania Station and the ride is about 2 hours. As always NADA Hudson will be free and open to the public.

RYAN WALLACE | CONSENSUS
NADA HUDSON | MORGAN LEHMAN GALLERY
July 28-29, 2012
Basilica Hudson 110 South Front Street, Hudson, NY

The New Art Dealers Alliance and Basilica Hudson are pleased to announce NADA Hudson, a large scale exhibition featuring 51 projects presented by NADA members and affiliates. NADA Hudson is not an art fair, but rather a site-specific project produced by the New Art Dealers Alliance, which will build upon the character of a historic venue in showcasing contemporary sculpture, installation and performance.Morgan Lehman Gallery will be exhibiting Ryan Wallace’s Consensus series. In his Consensus sculptures, Ryan Wallace explores the nature of perception. He combines his allure to contemporary science with his skepticism of representing the spiritual and mystical, suggesting the only constant among these disciplines to be the limit of human observation. The stones are arranged in formations inside vitrines behind varied tinted films. The automotive tints act as a filter, skewing the repeated objects visual reception. The rocks themselves suggest the possibility of infinite replication, with the exception of the tinted screen, which suggests the uniqueness and malleable nature of individual perception.These mineral formations in Wallace’s trompe l’oeil sculptures are “insignificant arrangements” but that the compositions force a viewer to consider a “potential higher meaning,” creating formal exercises that can’t escape their loaded nature. He cites Giuseppe Penone’s river stones, Stonehenge, and the caves of Lascaux and Cheveux among his influences, but claims the inspiration itself is analogous to the drive behind the scientist: the desire for discovery. Wallace’s usage of pedestrian media like auto tints and vitrines in the fine art context works to break down the barriers between high versus low, art object versus scientific display.

The Basilica Hudson, built in 1884 as a foundry and forge for the manufacture of steel railway wheels, is the last great 19th century building on the Hudson waterfront. NADA is grateful for the team at Basilica Hudson who offer a home for the artistic and cultural community at large. NADA Hudson will occupy nearly 8,000 square feet of indoor space, a theatre space and well over 10,000 square feet of outdoor space.

Hudson, New York is becoming a popular satellite city for cultural activity. Hudson is home to many dealers specializing in antiques and decorative arts, while also attracting international artists like Marina Abromovic and Jason Middlebrook. Hudson is very accessible to visitors from New York City. Trains run frequently to Hudson about every hour leaving from Pennsylvania Station and the ride is about 2 hours. As always NADA Hudson will be free and open to the public.

KCLOG

BURNT BRIDGE

David Kennedy Cutler’s essay, THE SKY INSIDE